Three Common Myths About Workers’ Comp Law

Home > James M. Snow Blog, High Point, NC > Three Common Myths About Workers’ Comp Law

In my years practicing workers’ comp law, I have encountered several common myths about workers’ comp cases and how to handle them. I believe that you deserve to have accurate information about these matters so that you can make the best decision about what to do following a workplace injury, and at my firm, James M. Snow Law, I will take the time to make sure you have a solid understanding of your legal situation. In this article, I will go over a few of the most common myths I have heard and explain why and how they are inaccurate.

Three Common Myths About Workers’ Comp Law

  • Myth #1: You can only get workers’ comp if you were injured while actively performing your work duties. One common piece of misinformation about workers’ comp law is that you can only get compensation if you were injured while actively working on your job. Fortunately, this is not true. If you were injured in the course and scope of your employment, which can include breaks, going and coming from the employer parking, participating in company activities and other circumstances, you may be eligible for compensation.
  • Myth #2: You can only get compensation if you were injured at a jobsite. Another myth about workers’ compensation law that I hear a lot is that you are only eligible for benefits if your injury occurred on a jobsite. This is not true either, as auto accidents make up a significant portion of workers’ compensation claims. While you generally can’t make a workers’ comp claim if you got into an accident on your commute, if you drive as part of your job and get into a crash while making your rounds, you are absolutely eligible.
  • Myth #3: Hiring a workers’ comp attorney will eat up your benefits. A third misconception that people have about workers’ comp law cases is that hiring an attorney will be so expensive that it will use up any financial benefits you are awarded. Fortunately, that’s not how it works. I (and other workers’ comp lawyers) work on a contingency fee basis, which means that I only get paid if your claim is successful. I will discuss with you how I intend to add benefits to your case, not take them away.